Beretta Blog

Don't Overlook the 28-Gauge

Posted by Tom Keer on Jul 3, 2018 9:13:11 AM

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I don't know if there is any one correct order of buying shotguns. That said, my own purchases seem to mirror that used by a lot of folks with whom I shoot and hunt.

Oddly enough, the first shotgun I shot was a .410 which was considered a 'boy's gun.' The recoil was certainly light for an elementary school kid, but the small amount of shot in each shell really meant that I'd have to be an experienced shooter to hit with one. In essence, the .410 is a 'man's gun,' but that description was reserved for the shotgun I first bought: a 12 gauge. I chose that shotgun for use on clays, pheasant, turkey, and waterfowl. A few months later I added a second shotgun which was a 20 gauge. The smaller bore was better suited for grouse, woodcock, quail and other smaller birds. Along the way, I added a 16 gauge, a 28 gauge, and even a .410.

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Topics: Hunting - Upland

The Concealed Carry Draw

Posted by Tom McHale on Jul 2, 2018 10:53:11 AM

Draw steps

I don’t give a hoot about my “open carry” draw.

To clarify, drawing from an outside the waistband holster without a cover garment isn’t relevant in my chosen universe. Indeed, if I were passionate about competing in action shooting sports like USPSA or Steel Challenge, then an “open” draw would be crucial to me.

I like to compete, but I view competition as an opportunity to test and improve my skills with my everyday carry gear, sans “cheating.” That means I use my carry gun with no lightweight trigger modifications. It means I use my every day inside the waistband holster with an actual shirt or jacket that I wear when out and about. I don’t "game" my carry configuration to shave some fractions of seconds from the clock just because it’s a competition. If my setup puts me at a competitive disadvantage, so be it. My purpose, after all, is to get better with what I carry and use.

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Topics: Concealed Carry

Shooting Glasses for Shotgunners

Posted by Bill Miller on Jul 2, 2018 9:00:00 AM

eyewear-for-shooters

There are two reasons every shotgunner needs to wear shooting glasses. First, and most important is for protection of your eyes. Second, is to enhance your ability to see the targets quickly and clearly.

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Topics: Clay Shooting

Basics of the Shotgun Games: American 16-Yard Trap

Posted by Bill Miller on Jun 29, 2018 9:00:00 AM

trap_1_Beretta
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Topics: Clay Shooting

It Don't Mean a Thing If It Ain't Got the Right Swing

Posted by Tom Keer on Jun 28, 2018 9:05:00 AM

Tom Keer Swing landscape

Recently, Beretta columnist Bill Miller explored different types of wingshooting techniques from a practical perspective of hand-eye coordination and mechanics. Now it's time to look at how those techniques apply in the field for different situations. Tom Keer explores the topic in more detail.

I didn't mind that the week of snow that fell in knee-high drifts ended my grouse season. It had been a great few months of snap shooting over solid points. While inland coverts were now a frozen tundra, the nearby ocean hadn't yet iced over. Add to the fact that the cold snap pushed big flocks of sea ducks, Canada geese, and Brant into the bay it was easy for me to make the switch. All I had to do was to trade my 28 gauge for a 12-gauge, my lead shot for steel, and my blaze orange for camo.

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Topics: Hunting - Upland, Hunting - Duck, hunting - waterfowl

Pistol Science: The Rotary Recoil System

Posted by Tom McHale on Jun 27, 2018 9:01:00 AM

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By very definition, semi-automatic pistols all have some basic features and functions in common. What makes them "semi-automatic" is the recoil system that performs a carefully orchestrated process of:

  • Moving the slide to the rear.
  • Ejecting the spent cartridge case.
  • Cocking the hammer or striker for the next shot.
  • Moving forward and stripping a fresh cartridge from the magazine.
  • Loading that cartridge into the chamber as the slide closes and locks into position.
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Topics: New Shooters, Handguns

Shooting Singles Versus Flocks

Posted by Tom Keer on Jun 26, 2018 9:03:00 AM

Tom Keer Bird

Two braces, one pair of pointers and another pair of setters, carved up the field like there was no tomorrow. They all arrived at the same place at slightly different times. A pointer locked up followed by a setter's honor followed by a pointer's honor and then the back by the final setter. This covey was likely to be a hatblower, a term I learned from long-time bird doggers Ed and Sheila Hart. Hatblowers are big coveys, with some ranging between 50 and 75 birds strong. When they flush all a once there is a rush of air so strong that it nearly blows your hat off of your head.

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Topics: Hunting - Upland, hunting - waterfowl

The Right Kind of Clays

Posted by Tom Keer on Jun 25, 2018 8:34:00 AM

Tom Keer Clays 1-1

It's conventional wisdom to do a few things prior to bird hunting season. Wax your cotton chaps, clean your guns, road your dogs, and drop a few hard-earned pounds from summer BBQ's. Other items need tending, but getting ready for the season by shooting clays is a whole lot of fun.

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Topics: Clay Shooting, Hunting - Upland, Hunting - Duck, hunting - waterfowl

Semi-Auto: First & Forever Shotgun

Posted by Bill Miller on Jun 22, 2018 9:38:00 AM

semi-auto3_Beretta_Blog

Spend a pre-hunting season Saturday afternoon at a sporting goods store, and chances are pretty good you’ll witness this scenario.

A parent, seeking a first shotgun for a son or daughter, walks in and makes a beeline to the single-shots, maybe with a glance at the pumps on the way. The youth points at the semi-automatic rack but is ushered away quickly. Eavesdropping, you’ll hear: “Too expensive,” “Too big for you,” “Adult’s gun.” Or the worst, “Those are dangerous!”

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Topics: Clay Shooting

If It Fits, Shoot It

Posted by Tom Keer on Jun 21, 2018 9:38:00 AM

Girl with Beretta 28 gauge

I admit that I was worried when I looked around the gun shop's tremendous inventory. I'd need nerves of steel to depart without making a purchase. That said, shotguns are like potato chips, you can't just have one. And so I squared my shoulders and started reviewing the Over/Unders, Side-by-Sides, Pumps, and Semi-Automatics to find one I couldn't live without. I'm always in the market for a new firearm, so that makes me a salesman's low-hanging fruit. And I'm sure it's a similar situation with you.

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Topics: Clay Shooting, Hunting - Upland, Hunting - Turkey, hunting - waterfowl