Beretta Blog

What Is a Shotgun Target Load?

Posted by Bill Miller on Jul 19, 2018 9:53:00 AM

what-is-target-load

All boiled down, a target load is any shell you drop into your shotgun with the intent of breaking a clay target. That can be anything from the most bargain basement, off-brand promotional load to a $5.00-per-shell exotic metal non-toxic variety.

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Topics: Clay Shooting

It's Just a Walk Through the Woods. Or Is It?

Posted by Tom Keer on Jul 18, 2018 9:41:00 AM

2014-10-09 22.32.11-2

The bell clanged as Rebel carved up the alder run. He blew through the pass-through cover, slowed and zig-zagged in the thick poplar, and picked up speed when he entered the alders. That last patch typically held birds, both he and I knew that. I wasn't surprised when his bell went silent, and his beeper began to sing.

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Topics: Hunting - Upland

The Great Shotgun Bead Debate: Part Two

Posted by Bill Miller on Jul 17, 2018 10:19:00 AM

Bead_Debate2

The debate over beads is so great, it cannot be contested, or even in explained, in one post, so we’re giving it a second. In Part One we learned the difference between single-projectile firearms which you aim and a shotgun which you point with a lot more margin for error. We also learned a shotgun will work perfectly well without beads and that some folks think it’s best to learn to shoot one that way. And finally, we covered front beads and mid-beads on modern shotguns.

Now it’s time to explore why many … make that most … top shotgunners consider highly visible beads so crucial on both target and field guns.

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Topics: Clay Shooting

The Great Shotgun Bead Debate: Part One

Posted by Bill Miller on Jul 16, 2018 9:24:00 AM

Bead_Debate1

Rifles and handguns are aimed. Shotguns are pointed. But what does that really mean?

It means shooting any firearm with a single projectile is precise. It requires time and attention to align the sighting system – whether open sights or optical sights – on the intended target. Alignment and steadiness are so critical that the best shooters control breathing and heartbeats to press the trigger at the absolute proper millisecond.

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Topics: Clay Shooting, Hunting - Upland, Hunting - Duck, Hunting - Turkey, hunting - waterfowl

Overcoming a Shooting Slump

Posted by Tom Keer on Jul 13, 2018 10:59:00 AM

Ready

I remember the dark time like it was yesterday. I missed very few birds in the early season heat, full foliage, and tough shooting conditions. But later on, when the leaves dropped and the first frost killed the thick understory I couldn't hit boo. Every time a dog went on point I was excited, and after every flush I missed. When the last day of the season game I considered taking up another sport.

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Topics: Hunting - Upland

Why Mount a Red Dot Sight on Your Pistol?

Posted by Caleb Giddings on Jul 10, 2018 9:22:12 AM

Beretta APX 9mm with RMR

Not too long ago, iron sights were the king of sighting systems for pistols and rifles. Rightfully so, as the fundamental designs of iron sights have remained largely unchanged for 300 years. Iron sights are thus a very mature technology that had been proven to be reliable and rugged. But slowly things began to change.

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Topics: Competitive Shooting, Self Defense, Dynamic Shooting, Handguns

Position is the key to upland birding hunting

Posted by Tom Keer on Jul 6, 2018 9:45:00 AM

positioning-in-upland-hunting

It was a perfect fall day, with frost on the ground, a light variable wind, and hardwoods bursting with color. The dogs easily differentiated between foot and body scent and were handily tacking down birds. All was right with the world except for my buddy's miserable shooting. His shooting reminded me of a season I had many years ago, one where I didn't know if I should wrap my gunning iron around a tree or take up another sport.

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Topics: Hunting - Upland

Staggered Shells

Posted by Tom Keer on Jul 5, 2018 9:25:00 AM

Staggered shells

There is nothing quite as satisfying as walking up on a staunch point, seeing a bird flush, and dropping it with one shot. The dog gets feathers in its mouth, you smile, and your buddies slap you on the back. But missed opportunities are as much of a part of wingshooting as hits, and by matching your loads to your chokes you'll have more successes than failures. That includes staggering your shells.

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Topics: Hunting - Upland

Don't Overlook the 28-Gauge

Posted by Tom Keer on Jul 3, 2018 9:13:11 AM

15

I don't know if there is any one correct order of buying shotguns. That said, my own purchases seem to mirror that used by a lot of folks with whom I shoot and hunt.

Oddly enough, the first shotgun I shot was a .410 which was considered a 'boy's gun.' The recoil was certainly light for an elementary school kid, but the small amount of shot in each shell really meant that I'd have to be an experienced shooter to hit with one. In essence, the .410 is a 'man's gun,' but that description was reserved for the shotgun I first bought: a 12 gauge. I chose that shotgun for use on clays, pheasant, turkey, and waterfowl. A few months later I added a second shotgun which was a 20 gauge. The smaller bore was better suited for grouse, woodcock, quail and other smaller birds. Along the way, I added a 16 gauge, a 28 gauge, and even a .410.

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Topics: Hunting - Upland

The Concealed Carry Draw

Posted by Tom McHale on Jul 2, 2018 10:53:11 AM

Draw steps

I don’t give a hoot about my “open carry” draw.

To clarify, drawing from an outside the waistband holster without a cover garment isn’t relevant in my chosen universe. Indeed, if I were passionate about competing in action shooting sports like USPSA or Steel Challenge, then an “open” draw would be crucial to me.

I like to compete, but I view competition as an opportunity to test and improve my skills with my everyday carry gear, sans “cheating.” That means I use my carry gun with no lightweight trigger modifications. It means I use my every day inside the waistband holster with an actual shirt or jacket that I wear when out and about. I don’t "game" my carry configuration to shave some fractions of seconds from the clock just because it’s a competition. If my setup puts me at a competitive disadvantage, so be it. My purpose, after all, is to get better with what I carry and use.

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Topics: Concealed Carry