Beretta Blog

It's Training Season: Get Your Bird Dog Out of Mothballs

Posted by Tom Keer on Mar 21, 2019 9:38:00 AM

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Repetitions make the master, short-handle for the fact that if you want to have a good dog during hunting season, then start your seasonal training in the spring. A perfect world has us working dogs all year long, and ideally we'd spend summers training in the cool, Northern climates. And then, at the first accumulation of snow, we'd follow the ducks, geese and woodcock to the more temperate and snow-free Southern regions adding quail, pheasant and snipe to their daily mix. Pro trainers follow that schedule, but for us bird doggers their wise approach isn't always possible. For us, our dogs pace in kennels surrounded by snow drifts just as they lounge around in front of the fireplace. Spring is in 6 weeks, Punxsutawney Phil told us that. When warmer weather finally arrives use these tips from the Eukanuba training pros to properly put your pup back to work.

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Topics: Hunting - Upland, UPLAND

Too Hot? Too Cold? The Right Upland Gear for Success in the Field

Posted by Tom Keer on Feb 7, 2019 9:45:00 AM

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It's late in the season, and that means a lot has changed since we first cut loose the dogs in the fall. Instead of winds blowing from the warm south, they now come from the cold north. Trees full of leaves first turned colorful and then dropped to the ground. Seasonally warm-if-not-hot temperatures and their associated dryness are replaced by colder weather and accompanying moisture. Scenting conditions are better with the cooler, windier, and damp weather, but what does the weather change do for hunters? If you're not careful, you'll certainly stay warm but you'll miss one heck of a lot of birds. Or you might stay too warm and overheat.

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Topics: Hunting, Hunting - Upland, UPLAND

Want to Quail Hunt? Read These Tips First

Posted by Tom Keer on Jan 30, 2019 11:39:22 AM

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Though it was 20 years ago, I remember looking out of my window like it was yesterday. The December wind honked from the Northeast, and with it came single-digit temperatures and a foot of snow. Sure I could slather up my dogs' paws with Musher's Secret, coat the inside of their bells with Pam spray to keep the clappers from filling up with ice, and slap on a pair of snow-shoes over my boots. My winter grouse hunt in the frozen tundra would be short thanks to the varsity effort required by all of us trudging through the snow. The birds likely would flush wild, I doubt I'd get even a single point, and if I did I'd have on so many layers that I wouldn't be able to move and would miss them anyway. I decided then and there that it was far better for me to head South and run the dogs on Bobwhite quail in ideal conditions. Nowadays, when our bird seasons close or the weather makes them impossible, I take my show on the road.

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Topics: Hunting - Upland, UPLAND